EXHIBITIONS NOT TO BE MISSED

 CHINESE ART IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION: FU BAOSHI (1904-1965)

October 16, 2011-January 8, 2012
Cleveland Museum of Art
The exhibition is the first collaboration between the Cleveland Museum and the Nanjing Museum which has the most significant collection of works by Fu Baoshi donated by the Fu family.
 
 
And at the Denver Art Museum, works by XU BEIHONG: PIONEER OF MODERN CHINESE PAINTING  (1895-1953)
Opens October 30, 2011
While this exhibit will include several of the loved and well known horse paintings, it will cover the full spectrum of his important works, drawn from the Xu Beihong Memorial Museum.
 
 
At the  ASIAN ART MUSEUM in SAN FRANCISCO

MAHARAJA:THE SPLENDOR OF INDIA’S ROYAL COURTS
October 21, 2011 – April 8, 2012
“The show will explore the extraordinary culture of princely India, showcasing rich and varied objects that reflect different aspects of royal life. On display will be both Indian and Western works, featuring paintings, photography, textiles and dress, jewelry, jeweled objects, metalwork and furniture.”
 
 
Also at the ASIAN is POETRY IN CLAY, Korean Buncheong Ceramics from the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art
September 1. 2011 – January 8, 2012

“Whimsical, rustic, direct, fresh, audacious, contemporary — these are some of the qualities that have been attributed to the type of Korean ceramics known as buncheong. Buncheong ceramics are characterized by their informal style and their use of white clay as an aesthetic feature. The exhibition Poetry in Clay, opening September 16 and running through January 8, 2012, will fill the museum’s Korean art galleries.

It features more than fifty-five masterpieces, including six Korean national treasures, from the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul, Korea. In addition, selected Japanese ceramics from the Asian Art Museum’s collections show Japanese connections to Korean ceramics. Finally, contemporary buncheong as well as other forms of contemporary art influenced by Korean ceramics, on loan from Korea, demonstrate the vitality of this vibrant art form today.”

 
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