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Archive for the ‘Asian Art’ Category

ON THE STEPPES OF GENGHIS KHAN – MONGOLIAN NOMADS

MOESGAARD MUSEUM, Denmark

https://www.moesgaardmuseum.dk/en/exhibitions/current-special-exhibitions/on-the-steppes-of-genghis-khan-mongolia-s-nomads/

Open until April 2019

genghis khan

ON THE STEPPES OF GENGHIS KHAN – MONGOLIAN NOMADS

Some of us always had a soft spot for Genghis Khan, the 13th century Great Khan of the Mongol Empire, and of the largest contiguous empire in history. The first thing I learned about Ghengis Kahan was that he listened to and respected his mother; that he was brutal and gentle at the same time; open to foreign religions; and instituted sophisticated government and taxing systems. The exhibit includes fantastic works from international loans and Danish museums showing the rich culture of these nomads of the steppes with their sheep, goats, horses and camels, often on the move, and in contact with merchants on ancient and present trade routes, bringing material wealth that can be seen in their ornaments, fabrics, costumes, tents and furniture. Reviews point out that the exhibit shows an intriguing alternative to our sedentary life.

 

Cheers,

Elisabeth

 

 

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THE JEWELED ISLE: ART FROM SRI LANKA

the jeweled isle

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART  

http://www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/jeweled-isle-art-sri-lanka

December 9, 2018 – June 23, 2019

First comprehensive exhibit of Sri Lankan art organized by an American museum!

Some 250 art works from LACMA’s extensive collection and numerous domestic and international lenders, this exhibit covers two thousand years of decorative and fine art including objects fashioned from gold, silver and ivory. Hinduism and Buddhism both are important for Sri Lanka’s culture and many religious sculptures, paintings, and architectural fragments from both religions are represented. Photographs from the island’s historical capitals – Anuradhapura, Polonnaruva and Kandy convey the importance of these monumental religious sites.

We have six months to see this exhibit!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

GANESHA:THE PLAYFUL PROTECTOR

GANESHA

Six-armed dancing Ganesha from India, Denver Art Museum.

GANESHA:THE PLAYFUL PROTECTOR
An exhibit developed in collaboration with the National Museum of Cambodia, Phnom Penh.

https://denverartmuseum.org/exhibitions/ganesha

On view through January 13, 2019

Enough time to travel to Denver and visit Ganesha in person- the remover of obstacles, known for granting wealth and success, found throughout the Asian subcontinent and across geographical and religious lines.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

 
Cambodian Ganesha
Cambodian Ganesha

COROMANDEL SCREENS ANYONE??

Courtesy Metropolitan Museum

COROMANDEL SCREENS ANYONE??

Many of us have seen, appraised, bought, sold so-called Coromandel screens. Chinese lacquer screens often with red, brown or black ground with large landscape and pavilions scenes and often scenes of dancers illustrating Ming dynasty and earlier theatrical dramas. We call the screens Coromandels screens but the term came into use only at the beginning of the 20th century. Coromandel because the screens were shipped from China via India’s Coromandel Coast of southeast India. In China the term for these screen was and is kuancai – meaning that the artisans hollowed out, carved and incised many layers of dried lacquer and filled in the gaps with colored lacquer or silver or gold. A time consuming technique.

Not much is written about Coromandel screens and this article in The Oriental Ceramic Society’s May 2018 Newsletter by HE Feng, a Ph.D. candidate at the Institute of East Asian Art History at Heidelberg University explains the history of these screens exported from China since the late 1700s.

COROMANDEL SCREENS

Lands of Asia

http://landsofasia.kimbellart.org

Until August 19th, 2018

Another very substantial Asian art exhibit in Texas- at the Kimbell Art Museum in Ft. Worth.

Between the Crow Collection Dallas, the Fine Arts Museum in Houston, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Asia Society Texas, Houston, the San Antonio Museum of Art, and most of all the Kimbell, Asian art lovers feel very fortunate in Texas.

Collected by Sam and Myrna Myers after they were posted in Paris in the mid 1960s, and eventually assembling some five thousand works of art including Asian, Roman and Greek antiquities. Driven by a passion for Asia, the Myers soon started to concentrate on East Asian pieces, particularly in jade, silk, porcelain and other refined materials.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

kimball

 

 

Korean screen reaches $ 562,500

Korean screen reaches a record $ 562,500; sold by Lark Mason Associates of New York and New Braunfels!

This is what every dealer and auctioneer hopes for …. a “Chinese” large twelve panel screen attributed to the 18th century with scenes from the Buddhist paradise turned out to be a rare Korean screen – employing Chinese subject matters. The screen sold to a Korean dealer and returned to Korea after a long sojourn in the United States. I love this story!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

 

screen

BINDING THE CLOUDS: THE ART OF CENTRAL ASIAN IKAT

February 17, 2018 Leave a comment

In case you have not noticed that The Textile Museum is now part of the George Washington University Museum

701 21st Street, NW, Washington,D.C.

https://museum.gwu.edu/textile-museum

From March 10th – July 9th, 2018

BINDING THE CLOUDS: THE ART OF CENTRAL ASIAN IKAT

will be shown from what is now Uzbekistan and Central Asian oasis towns.

Uzbekistan still makes very colorful and interesting ikat fabrics often seen at international folk art shows; saw it last in Santa Fe.