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Archive for the ‘Museums/Galleries’ Category

CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM

 

http://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/about/press-room/bimel-pr/

The Cincinnati Museum of Art has just received the single largest monetary gift  (11.75 million gift) in its history, adding to its collection of South Asian art, and the arts of Greater  Iran and Afghanistan – through the benevolence of Carl and Alice Bimei. The Bimeis collected  paintings including miniature paintings and other South Asian works of art.

Off to Cincinnati!

MY SUGGESTIONS FOR FALL IN PARIS…

WHEN IN PARIS……….not only to the Moulin Rouge  ……….
 
 A TOUR THAT FOCUSES ON  MAJOR COLLECTIONS OF ASIAN ART
OCTOBER 5TH- OCTOBER 7TH
ORGANIZED BY THE ORIENTAL CERAMIC SOCIETY: http://ocs-london.com
If you cannot join the OCS,  do it on your own. These are some of the best and oldest collections of Asian art in the world.
1. CHATEAU DE FONTAINEBLEAU with treasures from the Summer Palace
2. MUSEE GUIMET   (http://www.guimet.fr/en/)
3.  MUSEE D’ENNERY (musée Guimet  website)
4. MUSEE DU QUAI BRANLY (http://www.quaibranly.fr)  specializing in Asian ethnographic material
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

HARN MUSEUM OF ART IN FLORIDA

HARN MUSEUM OF ART

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Gainesville
The Harn Museum  recently completed conservation of seven paintings by Bengali artist Jamini Roy.  The Museum contains 45 paintings by the artist (1887-1972), the largest holdings by this artist outside India.
The Harn focuses on African and Asian art and contemporary and modern art and photography.  Asian art includes more than 2000 works  from China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia.
Enjoy!
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

RINGLING’S ASIAN ART CENTER

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The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art’s new Center For Asian Art  in the Dr. Helga Wall-Apelt Gallery of Asian Art has received generous gifts to erect a building designed by Machado Silvetti that will include a new pavilion and major renovations to the existing spaces. The Asian Art Center will display pieces form it permanent collection as well as gifts from the Kroger family and loans from the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation. Scheduled to open soon in 2016!
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

CAVE TEMPLES OF DUNHUANG: BUDDHIST ART ON CHINA’S SILK ROAD

 

CAVE TEMPLES OF DUNHUANG: BUDDHIST ART ON CHINA’S SILK ROAD

https://buddhistartnews.wordpress.com/2016/03/04/cave-temples-of-dunhuang-buddhist-art-on-chinas-silk-road/

GETTY CENTER, LOS ANGELES

May 7 – September 4, 2016

www.getty.edu

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If you cannot make it to Dunhuang to see the spectacular Mogao caves on the ancient Silk Road dating from the 4th to 14th centuries – then you should go to the Getty and see rare treasures found in the famous caves together with full size replicas of three of the caves. This is a cooperation between  the Getty Conservation Institute and  Dunhuang Academy together with several other American and Chinese cultural institutions. The Mogao caves are important because they document  the earliest evidence we have of how Buddhism travelled with monks, scholars and merchants to China and beyond.

Cheers,

Elisabeth and Natasha

PEARLS ON A STRING

PEARLS ON A STRING: ARTISTS, PATRONS & POETS AT THE GREAT ISLAMIC COURTS

February 26 – May 8, 2016
 
ASIAN ART MUSEUM 
 
San Francisco  www.asianart.org
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I have  always been interested in who and what fueled the high artistic achievements  of the Islamic world from the 16th through the 18th century  –  a time when the global movement of people and their ideas not only tolerated but furthered a cosmopolitan society that was very much inclusive.  Some sixty-four art works, including textiles, paintings, manuscripts, sculpture, metalwork and jeweled objects show us the way through 16th century Mughal India, 17th century Safavid Iran and 18th century Ottoman Turkey.
We follow the lead of a writer,  an artist and a patron.
The writer and historian  Abu’l Fazl ibn Mubarak (1551-1602) was employed at the court of Akbar the Great (ruled 1556-1602) as a writer, an advisor, scholar and chief secretary. His interest in religious sciences and philosophy resonated with the liberal sentiments of Akbar who surrounded himself with Jews, Hindus, Muslims and Christians.
 I have always been partial to Akbar the Great ever since visiting Fatehpur Sikri in India and visiting his grandfather’s (Emperor Babur the Tiger) tomb and garden in Kabul. And below my favorite portrait of Akbar.
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The artist and painter Muhammad Zaman ibn Haji Yusuf (active 1670-1700) at the Safavid court of Shah Sulayman (reigned 1666-1694) worked  in the cosmopolitan city of Isfahan. He is credited with dramatically changing the style of Persian painting by incorporating European  linear perspective and  contrasting light and shadow.
The great sponsor of the arts Sultan Mahmud I (ruled 1730-1754), the ruler of the Ottoman Empire brought merchants, artisans and the forerunners of engineers to cosmopolitan Istanbul to become personally involved with artistic commissions in the field of architecture, art and engineered and jeweled objects.
Enjoy this journey through once cosmopolitan countries – no longer so accessible to us.
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

UNDER -APPRECIATED AND UNDER-VALUED ASIAN ART

Yes there is some.
The spotlight has very long now been on very hot and very much in demand Chinese art resulting in sometimes exorbitant prices and sometimes these sales are not paid for.  But this is not what I want to talk about.
Lark Mason (larkmason.com) the Chinese art and antiques expert, independent curator, appraiser, consultant, educator and author and founder and president of iGavel Auctions and Chairman of Asia Week New York said something recently that resonated with me:
There are several areas of  fine, tribal and folk Asian art that can be purchased for under $ 5,000. He pointed to several areas:  Meiji period (1868-1912), (and later Japanese art I might add) such as bronze, ceramic and lacquer objects. I can think of several that recently sold at auction in the $ 1,200 to $ 5,000 range. Depending on your budget there are  also Japanese screens, Japanese contemporary ceramics, 19th century Japanese paintings all available in a reasonable price range.
Mr. Mason also mentioned art from Southeast Asia Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, Sri Lanka (and Laos and Indonesia I might add). SEA art is my specialty and I follow it closely. Many pieces especially from Cambodia can be quite expensive in comparison with the neighboring countries.
And there are Japanese woodblock prints. I just read a press release by Scholten Japanese Art participating in Asia Week with the exhibition: Ukiyo-e Tales: Stories from the Floating World. Most of you are familiar with color woodblock prints  and many were made in huge quantities, are still available in large quantities or at least later renditions thereof. Authentic prints, perhaps from the 18th and early 19th century, from a specific genre (kabuki actors, beautiful woman, warriors, erotica, etc), by an artist who did not produce so many prints and might be less known can be a good find and a little more expensive but still very reasonable for such a work of art. Scholten offers a very fine print by Eisen dated ca. 1830 for $ 3,800.
A dealer whose Japanese prints I have followed for a long time – floatingworld.com – offers several 20th century ukiyo-e prints between $ 5,000 and $ 10,000 and I wish I would have purchased them when these artists were in the $ 2,000 range and it was not that long ago.  Check them out and his more recent prints.
Martha Sutherland of  M. Sutherland mentions Chinese album leaf paintings by well known artists  to be quite affordable, under $ 5,000, whereas larger  works  by the same artists would be quite expensive.
I must not forget India having recently appraised some Chola pieces I am aware of the  high price tag but there are lesser known periods of Indian art, such as Nayak period as pointed out by Sanjay Kapoor of Kapoor Galleries.
So we should all have fun and  focus on one reasonably priced niche of Asian art it is quite doable! Very dangerous for me who has accumulated more than I can handle.
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha