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Archive for the ‘Painting’ Category

CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM

 

http://www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/about/press-room/bimel-pr/

The Cincinnati Museum of Art has just received the single largest monetary gift  (11.75 million gift) in its history, adding to its collection of South Asian art, and the arts of Greater  Iran and Afghanistan – through the benevolence of Carl and Alice Bimei. The Bimeis collected  paintings including miniature paintings and other South Asian works of art.

Off to Cincinnati!

RESTORING MEDIEVAL BUDDHIST SHRINES IN NEPAL’S HIMALAYAS

In this photograph taken on June 15, 2016 Nepalese artist Tsewang Jigme….restores  sacred murals…..in the remote Upper Mustang region.

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In Nepal’s  Upper Mustang region, once part of the Buddhist kingdom of Mustang high on the Tibetan plateau, the artist  Tsewang  Jigme works on the restoration of antique murals. It is said that murals in some temples in this area predate the oldest temples in Tibet.  But neglect, wind, rain and smoke have turned the bright frescoes into black. Many of these shrines survived the Cultural Revolution of the 1960’s and the earthquake of  April 2015.
Read this article to see how the restoration of these sacred murals is making progress in the 21st century: http://www.mysinchew.com/node/114954?tid=
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

PEARLS ON A STRING

PEARLS ON A STRING: ARTISTS, PATRONS & POETS AT THE GREAT ISLAMIC COURTS

February 26 – May 8, 2016
 
ASIAN ART MUSEUM 
 
San Francisco  www.asianart.org
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I have  always been interested in who and what fueled the high artistic achievements  of the Islamic world from the 16th through the 18th century  –  a time when the global movement of people and their ideas not only tolerated but furthered a cosmopolitan society that was very much inclusive.  Some sixty-four art works, including textiles, paintings, manuscripts, sculpture, metalwork and jeweled objects show us the way through 16th century Mughal India, 17th century Safavid Iran and 18th century Ottoman Turkey.
We follow the lead of a writer,  an artist and a patron.
The writer and historian  Abu’l Fazl ibn Mubarak (1551-1602) was employed at the court of Akbar the Great (ruled 1556-1602) as a writer, an advisor, scholar and chief secretary. His interest in religious sciences and philosophy resonated with the liberal sentiments of Akbar who surrounded himself with Jews, Hindus, Muslims and Christians.
 I have always been partial to Akbar the Great ever since visiting Fatehpur Sikri in India and visiting his grandfather’s (Emperor Babur the Tiger) tomb and garden in Kabul. And below my favorite portrait of Akbar.
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The artist and painter Muhammad Zaman ibn Haji Yusuf (active 1670-1700) at the Safavid court of Shah Sulayman (reigned 1666-1694) worked  in the cosmopolitan city of Isfahan. He is credited with dramatically changing the style of Persian painting by incorporating European  linear perspective and  contrasting light and shadow.
The great sponsor of the arts Sultan Mahmud I (ruled 1730-1754), the ruler of the Ottoman Empire brought merchants, artisans and the forerunners of engineers to cosmopolitan Istanbul to become personally involved with artistic commissions in the field of architecture, art and engineered and jeweled objects.
Enjoy this journey through once cosmopolitan countries – no longer so accessible to us.
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

WHERE IS THE ORIGINAL – IN NEW YORK OR IN CHINA?

An interesting situation developed for a Chinese National Treasure— a painting hanging in the Forbidden Palace in Beijing and by some scholars long thought not to be the original by the Five Dynasties court painter Zhou Wenju (active  942-961) but a rendering by the Sung  Emperor Zhou who delighted in rendering or making studies of earlier masterworks— an activity often encountered in Chinese art.

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The book “Original Intentions” edited by Nicholas Pearce and Jason Steuber deals extensively with productions, reproductions and interpretations in the arts of China (University Press of Florida 2012). Such later renderings of original works of art make it often enormously difficult to authenticate Chinese paintings. And who is to say whether  the original or the  exact rendering of the original should be worth more?
Now a painting has surfaced in New York  that is thought to be the original  done by the artist himself. The painting will be offered by Gianguan Auctions, formerly Hong Kong Auctions on March 19th. The painting is titled “Chess Game abut of Screen”.
I am curious who is behind Gianguan Auctions?  A quick internet search:
Gianguan Auctions

Gianguan Auctions (also known as Hong Kong Auctions) specializes in Chinese and Asian arts and has a wide clientele from China and Asia. Established in Hong Kong in 2002, a New York office opened in 2004. Four times a year, auctions are held at the Lefcourt Building on New York’s Madison Ave. Under the management of Mr. Kwong Lum, Gianguan has successfully sourced high-quality consignments that has resulted in record prices. Recently, Mr. Lum was appointed by Beijing’s National Museum’s Appraisal Centre as its chief consultant, an exceptional honour, which solidifies their reputation as experts in Chinese, antiques.

Gianguan Auctions Fine Chinese Art Auctions include an important selection of American Chinese private collections of traditional painting and calligraphy, bronzes, porcelain, jade and scholars items, dating from the Soong Dynasty to contemporary time with representations from each period”.

Go to gianguanauctions.com to see the catalogue of their upcoming auction.
Cheers
Elisabeth and Natasha

AGA KHAN MUSEUM OPENS IN TORONTO

October 13, 2014 Leave a comment

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http://www.akdn.org/museum/collections.asp

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The first museum in North America entirely dedicated to the arts of Islam and Islamic cultures opened in Toronto in September. Founded by His Highness the Aga Khan, pieces in the museum have been collected by His Highness and members of his family for several generations. About two hundred pieces from the permanent collection will be on display at any one time.

The two inaugural exhibits are:

IN SEARCH OF THE ARTIST: SIGNED DRAWINGS AND PAINTINGS FROM THE AGA KHAN MUSEUM COLLECTION, open through November 16th.

THE GARDEN OF IDEAS: CONTEMPORARY ART FROM PAKISTAN, open through January 18th.

The museum has some 1000 pieces of art and artifacts, covering one thousand years of Islamic history and including works of Muslim civilizations from the Iberian Peninsula to China.

Where else can you find:

Arts of the Book

Carpets and Textiles

Ceramics, Mosaic

Ivory and Mother-of-pearl

Marble and Stucco

Glass, Rock Crystal and Jade

Metalwork

Paintings

Wood and Lacquer

Carpets-and-Textiles

 

Cheers,

Elisabeth

The Art of Continuity: Revering our Elders

November 23, 2013 Leave a comment

The Art of Continuity: Revering our Elders

ANCESTOR WORSHIP EXHIBIT AT THE PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM IN PASADENA, CA.

The Art of Continuity: Revering our Elders

December 14, 2013 – January 5, 2014.

http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org/_on_view/exhibitions/2012/continuity.aspx

So much Chinese art – painting, sculpture and other objects are connected with ancestor worship, reverence for elders, Confucian family values, rituals for guiding them through transition to afterlife. This exhibit features paintings and sculpture from East Asia and Papua New Guinea.

Check it out!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

ISAMU NOGUCHI AND QI BAISHI

October 29, 2013 Leave a comment

BEIJING 1930

NOGUCHI MUSEUM   noguchi.org.

through January 26th
9-01  33rd Road, at Vernon Boulevard, LOG ISLAND CITY, QUEENS

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Image: Isamu Noguchi, Peking Drawing (Man sitting), 1930 and Qi Baishi, Crabs, c. 1930

Both artists in one exhibit, organized jointly by the Noguchi Museum and the  University of Michigan Museum of Art, and focusing on their six month period together in Beijing. The 26 year old Noguchi who had had  mentors  like Brancusi and Buckminster Fuller, worked with, learned from  and was inspired by  Qi Baishi who was by then in his late 60s. Chinese ink paintings, strong lines, thin brush strokes; one concentrating on figures and Qi on whimsical things from nature. After six months Noguchi went to New York  fully intending to return to Beijing to ” learn the art of the brush” but the Japanese invasion of Manchuria put an end to this.

I had a chance to appraise one of Qi Baishi’s crab paintings some years ago and just recently I appraised a set of prints by the artist originating at  his 

his Rong Bao Zhai studio, Beijing. 

Cheers,

Elisabeth

Categories: Asian Art, Painting