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THE TRAMMEL AND MARGARET CROW FAMILY HAS DONATED THEIR ENTIRE COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART

January 29, 2019 Leave a comment

crow

THE TRAMMEL AND MARGARET CROW FAMILY HAS DONATED THEIR ENTIRE COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART – INCLUDING THE MUSEUM, INCLUDING 23 MILLION IN SUPPORT FUNDS, INCLUDING A 12,000 BOOK LIBRARY TO THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS. 

This move is comparable to the Asian art gift Avery Brundage gave to the City of San Francisco over 50 years ago eventually founding the ASIAN in SFO.

My first experience with the Crow’s Asian art happened in the late 1980s when my mother was visiting from Vienna and decided to stay at the Anatole in Dallas. The Anatole (one of the Crow hotels I later learned) was lovely but it was the large Indian marble temple and the Khmer sculptures in the lobby and in glass cases that immediately caught may attention. And then I learned more and more about the Crow collection, and over twenty years ago the Trammel and Margaret Crow Museum of Asian Art opened on Flora in Dallas with works from Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam, with the famous jade room at its center. I understand that the collection comprises some one thousand pieces of art.

The Museum will continue to operate in its current location with a full schedule of exhibits with items from ancient to contemporary times. And its long time director Amy Lewis Hofland will continue in her role for both museum sites. So beyond the original idea of Mr. Crow of increasing the public’s knowledge about and appreciation for Asian art, the University of Texas at Dallas is continuing to help students and to a larger extent the Texas community appreciate and learn about Asian art. I could not be happier about this for Texas!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

THE JEWELED ISLE: ART FROM SRI LANKA

the jeweled isle

LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART  

http://www.lacma.org/art/exhibition/jeweled-isle-art-sri-lanka

December 9, 2018 – June 23, 2019

First comprehensive exhibit of Sri Lankan art organized by an American museum!

Some 250 art works from LACMA’s extensive collection and numerous domestic and international lenders, this exhibit covers two thousand years of decorative and fine art including objects fashioned from gold, silver and ivory. Hinduism and Buddhism both are important for Sri Lanka’s culture and many religious sculptures, paintings, and architectural fragments from both religions are represented. Photographs from the island’s historical capitals – Anuradhapura, Polonnaruva and Kandy convey the importance of these monumental religious sites.

We have six months to see this exhibit!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

SCULPTURE PARK AT MADHAVENDRA PALACE IN JAIPUR, INDIA

January 22, 2018 Leave a comment

 

https://www.thesculpturepark.in

The first significant sculpture park for India was recently launched with a collaboration between the Government of Rajasthan and the non-profit organization Saath Sath Arts. The Sculpture Park turned the entire palace into an art gallery with pieces both indoors and outdoors. Artists include Jitish Kallat, Huma Bhaba and Bharti Kher. The Saath Sath Arts was founded by Aparajita Jain, one of a group of private individuals passionate about the arts, trying to fill the arts funding gap (since the Indian government is not very engaged in supporting the arts) and actively promoting international exchange between India and the rest of the world and closely working with international museums, curators and galleries. Women are actively engaged in the arts (and business) in India and six of the eight board members of Saath Sath are women.

 

jaipur

 

Cheers,

Elisabeth

 

ANCIENT BUDDHIST CARVING EXCAVATED IN THE SWAT VALLEY IN PAKISTAN

I do not want to disclose the exact location  — we do not need any more obliterations of Buddhist sculptures — but carvings dating back some 1700 years have been found in the remains of an old shrine. The fragment shows  what is known as The Great Departure  — the historical Prince Siddhartha leaving his palace in Kapilavastu venturing outside the castle confines to experience suffering and eventually attain enlightenment  to become Gautama Buddha.

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Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

LOST KINGDOMS

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(Buddha from Central Thailand, first half of the 7th century, Sandstone, National Museum, Bangkok)

LOST KINGDOMS
HINDU-BUDDHIST SCULPTURE OF EARLY SOUTHEAST ASIA, 5th to 8th CENTURY
METROPOLITAN MUSEUM

April 14-July 27, 2014

I will never forget the first time I saw a Dvaravati Buddha in the  museum in Nakhon Pathom, Thailand, carved by highly skilled stone sculptors, related to Indian style, and with the Wheel of Law.

Now we have a chance to admire some 160 sculptures from museums in Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore and Myanmar, as well as the Musée Guimet in Paris and some major museums in the United States, showing very early art from kingdoms mostly forgotten today  – Funan, Champa, Pyu, Zhenla, Kedah, Dvaravati and Srivijaya. With exception of Gandharan, Mathura, Gupta styles, these are the earliest Buddhist  sculptures  to encounter and they might help us understand  the cultural and political map of today’s Southeast Asia.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

10th CENTURY KHMER STONE STATUE TO BE RETURNED TO CAMBODIA

December 19, 2013 Leave a comment

JPCAMBODIA-popup

Said to have been looted from a temple in the Cambodian jungle during the Po Pot reign of terror, the US Attorney’s Office in Manhattan, Sotheby’s, and the owner of the figure agreed to return the 500 pound sandstone warrior to Cambodia. It is interesting that the US government has been so successful – while it is true that nobody should deal in stolen antiquities, it was also agreed that the US Attorney’s Office in Manhattan agreed to withdraw its accusation that Sotheby’s and the owner/consignor knew about the statue’s disputed history. I also find it interesting that the laws some of the accusations were based upon dated from a time when Cambodia was a French colony, and pursuing this case would entail time consuming research into Cambodian, French Colonial, US and other laws governing antiquities. I think some of the parties were on thin ice and the US government was very helpful. Based on the information I could find, the owner/consignor did not receive any compensation, Sotheby’s will pay for shipping the statue to Cambodia – what a good deal for Cambodia.

I hope the warrior from Prasat Chen finds a safe place for the next thousand years!

I only wish the Cambodian government would pursue the welfare of its children as seriously as the welfare of its stone figures.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

The Art of Continuity: Revering our Elders

November 23, 2013 Leave a comment

The Art of Continuity: Revering our Elders

ANCESTOR WORSHIP EXHIBIT AT THE PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM IN PASADENA, CA.

The Art of Continuity: Revering our Elders

December 14, 2013 – January 5, 2014.

http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org/_on_view/exhibitions/2012/continuity.aspx

So much Chinese art – painting, sculpture and other objects are connected with ancestor worship, reverence for elders, Confucian family values, rituals for guiding them through transition to afterlife. This exhibit features paintings and sculpture from East Asia and Papua New Guinea.

Check it out!

Cheers,

Elisabeth