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GERMAN BATIK ARTIST (BRIGITTE WILLACH ) MEETS JAVANESE BATIK GROUP BIMASAKTI

batik

Brigitte Willach: “Jean’s Garden”, 2006; on Indonesian cotton.

This caught my attention in the most recent Textiles Asia Journal….

An extraordinary batik artist from Germany who has worked successfully for over twenty years creating batik in naturalistic, impressionistic and recently in abstract fashion has a special love for a group of batik artists – women and men – in central Java who have created very high quality batik in traditional designs, including for the court. The TEXTILES ASIA JOURNAL published in their Many 2017, Volume 9, Issue 1 an article written by Brigitte Willach about the Bimasakti batik group comprising about thirty members in a collective with six leading women.

Too bad I cannot show any photos from this article or give you a link but you can go to textilesasia.com and order your copy of the magazine TEXTILES ASIA JOURNAL; the magazine is published three times a year by Bonnie Corwin, bonniemcorwin@gmail.com and always contains with articles about subject matters, books, exhibitions, reports about textiles from all over Asia you do not find any place else by experts in their respective field. You may be able to buy the magazine at the Textile Museum in Washington,D.C. (remember it is now located at George Washington University on 231st Street,N.W.), Asian Art Museum in SFO, Josh Graham Oriental Textiles in London, Carole Cassidy Lao Textiles in Vientiane.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

British Museum’s Free Exhibition

February 12, 2016 Leave a comment

Given to the British Museum in 1905 by Perceval Landon (a friend of Rudyard Kipling), the museum is exhibiting the Vrindavani Vastra woven textile from the 21st of January until the 15th of August. This is a free exhibit and open to the public.

This late 17th century silk textile is woven with a technique that no longer exists in India today. Extending over a length of more than 9 meters, the textile shows different scenes of the life of Krishna and a verse from the Bhagavata Purana, a 10th century text.

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Additional items from this period will also be displayed alongside the textile.

More information can be found by clicking the following link : Indian Textile at British Museum

Cheers,

Elisabeth and Natasha

 

The ASIAN ART NEWSPAPER

February 27, 2015 Comments off

FOR COLLECTORS, DEALERS, MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES 

If you want to stay informed about Asian art exhibits in North America, Asia, Europe and Australia – look it up in the Asian Art Newspaper, published every month. Has in-depth articles on artists, museums, cities with Asian art collections.

asianartnewspaper.com

paper and digital

Equally informative is TEXTILES ASIA Journal. The January edition carries a wonderful article on the significance of the zodiac animal of sheep – at the beginning of a new lunar year of the sheep, decoration on Angkorian architecture decoration and their connection and presentation on textiles; Barkcloth at the Djakarta Textile Museum; Taiwan National Museum’s exhibition of the Qipao, the Mandarin term for cheongsam, the stylish and tight fitting dress made fashionable by Shanghai society in the 1920s.

textilesasia.com

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Cheers,

Elisabeth

TEXTILES

November 14, 2013 Leave a comment

Dear China Coast Friends,

TEXTILES      

PRESERVATION    DISPLAY    CONSERVATION    STORAGE

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This is a little bit off my subject but I receive so many calls about how to preserve and display textiles that I decided to post this  article by Julia M. Brennan that appeared recently in  TEXTILES ASIA (www.textilesasia.com). 

Julia Brennan has been passionately involved with  textile conservation and preservation around the world  on behalf of collectors, museums, historical associations and foreign governments for over twenty-five years. In this article she highlights  a number of  issues concerning display, storage, temperature and insects.  She works with European tapestries, Oriental carpets and Asian textiles.   Her website is: www.caringfortextiles.com

I have permission to show the article as it was printed in the Textiles Asia magazine.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

Categories: Asian Art, Textiles

Textiles make the world go round!

September 24, 2013 Leave a comment

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 Must see exhibit
INTERWOVEN GLOBE: THE WORLDWIDE TEXTILE TRADE 1500-1800
Metropolitan Museum September 16, 2013 to January 5, 2014

If you have ever wondered about the origin of the inexpensive and colorful tree of life  block printed Indian cotton  bedcovers – go to this Metropolitan Museum exhibit and learn all about the international textile trade shaped for centuries by the cultures of China, India, Europe, the Middle East  and  South America. The Silk Road already saw expensive fabrics sent to wealthy Roman patrons  but this exhibit  focuses on the time after international traders searched for a sea route further south after Constantinople  was captured by the  Ottomans Turks, —  and  along the way the merchants  found textiles. It is rare that an entire exhibit filling several galleries is devoted to textiles. The Portuguese,  the Dutch, the British, often sponsored and financed by their  trading companies  crisscrossed the globe and spread designs,  colors and fabrics across the world. Craftsmen and artists  influenced and copied each other.  I have always been very partial to the  palambore fabric, lush in design and  colors,  with exotic plant and  flowers, perhaps first designed in England but made into something distinctly Indian.

If you want to read about textiles made for trade and export, you will enjoy:

WOVEN CARGOES  INDIAN TEXTILES IN THE EAST, by John Guy,Thames and Hudson, 1998. John Guy is a Curator in the Indian and South-East Asian Department at the V & A, London. The book describes the trade in Indian textiles to Southeast Asia and the Far East. There is a wonderful photo on page  168 of a Japanese Kosode (undergarment) kimono made from an Indian palambore fabric with flowering tree design from the eighteenth century.

ww.amazon.com/Woven-Cargoes-Indian-Textiles-East/dp/0500018634/ref=sr_1_sc_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1379548127&sr=8-1-spell&keywords=woven+vacrgoes

And textile lovers should never forget the  TEXTILES ASIA JOURNAL,  BONNIE CORWIN, PUBLISHER AND EDITOR.

www.textileasia.com

Cheers,

Elisabeth and Natasha

Recomended Titles

I recently came across a few very interesting books that I wanted to share with you.

1. THREADS OF SILK AND GOLD:ORNAMENTAL TEXTILES FROM MEIJI JAPAN
 McDermott, Hiroko T. and Pollard, Clare, Oxford, 2012.
thredFor years I have tried to convince clients, collectors  and dealers of the merits of late 19th/early 20th century Japanese textiles, some made for export. These are very accomplished embroideries, often with resist-dye silks and velvets, tapestry works,  and appliqué – used for large textiles but also for  kimonos we so much admire. I believe they were  and  still are not appreciated so much because they date from a relatively late period but one forgets that many of these techniques are no longer used today and have become rare. The textiles and kimonos once used are no longer in demand. If you find an artist in Japan who still works with these techniques, his/her works are often more expensive than the older version.
I believe this is the first English language book  on this subject.
So enjoy this book!
2. Something on a controversial subject — because not so much understood by Westerners. It does not have to be controversial!
ORIGINAL INTENTIONS:ESSAYS ON PRODUCTION, REPRODUCTION, AND INTERPRETATION IN THE ARTS OF CHINA
Pearce, Nicholas & Steuber, Jason, Gainesville 2012.
2This book deals with the old question of authenticity – in Chinese culture everything has a precedent,  and paintings, sculpture and other works are produced, reproduced, replicated not so much to fake but to render something  according to  and in hommage to earlier masters. This approach goes back all the way to antiquity when jade and bronze pieces from earlier periods were replicated. Later emperors excelled in producing wares imitating such earlier renditions.
There is a fundamental difference between faking to cheat – detested by the Chinese scholar and artist, and copying a work of art; the difference is clearly expressed in the language of Chinese connoisseurship –intention is everything.  The books deals with ceramics, paintings, sculptural pieces and paintings.
3. Ending with a Japanese artist who was born at the beginning of the Meiji period (1868-1912) when Japan opened up to the West and western ideas, western perspective.
KAMISAKA SEKKA:RINPA TRADITIONALIST, MODERN DESIGNER
Marks, Andreas, Petaluma, 2012
3Kamisaka Sekka (1866-1942) was one of Japan’s leading artist, designer and art instructor. He led the revival of the 17th century Rinpa style while at the same time  creating modern designs  in ceramics, lacquer ware, textiles and woodblock prints, combining Japanese and Western design influences.  I especially admire his woodblock prints which can be bold and elegant at the same time. The Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture in Hanford, California  had an exhibition about Kamisaka Sekka in summer  2012 featuring his paintings, scrolls and prints.
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Read and Enjoy!
Elisabeth and Natasha

BATIK: SPECTACULAR TEXTILES OF JAVA

February 7, 2013 Leave a comment

THE ASIAN ART MUSEUM IN SAN FRANCISCO

November 2, 2012 to May 5, 2013
Batik-exhibition-1
Batik is found almost everywhere today – as upholstery fabric, as fashion fabric or as a work of art.  This exhibit is a reminder of what batik first looked like and how it incorporated motifs from a wide variety of religions and cultures into its design.
The art of batik, a wax- resist dyeing technique may have been practiced for thousands of years in other parts of Asia but it was in Indonesia on the island of Java that  batik  has not only reached  the highest level of craftsmanship but has long played  an important role for everyday and ceremonial cloth.
Special designs were used for special occasions and sometimes batik was decorated with gold leaf or dust. Contemporary batik is very different in color and design from the traditional methods used in Yogyakarta and Surakarta. While traditional batik uses predominantly indigo and brown — most commonly available natural dyes — batik artists now use an array of striking colors and designs.
Enjoy the exhibit!
Elisabeth and Natasha