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Lands of Asia

http://landsofasia.kimbellart.org

Until August 19th, 2018

Another very substantial Asian art exhibit in Texas- at the Kimbell Art Museum in Ft. Worth.

Between the Crow Collection Dallas, the Fine Arts Museum in Houston, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Asia Society Texas, Houston, the San Antonio Museum of Art, and most of all the Kimbell, Asian art lovers feel very fortunate in Texas.

Collected by Sam and Myrna Myers after they were posted in Paris in the mid 1960s, and eventually assembling some five thousand works of art including Asian, Roman and Greek antiquities. Driven by a passion for Asia, the Myers soon started to concentrate on East Asian pieces, particularly in jade, silk, porcelain and other refined materials.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

kimball

 

 

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Korean screen reaches $ 562,500

Korean screen reaches a record $ 562,500; sold by Lark Mason Associates of New York and New Braunfels!

This is what every dealer and auctioneer hopes for …. a “Chinese” large twelve panel screen attributed to the 18th century with scenes from the Buddhist paradise turned out to be a rare Korean screen – employing Chinese subject matters. The screen sold to a Korean dealer and returned to Korea after a long sojourn in the United States. I love this story!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

 

screen

Empress Cixi of China

February 27, 2018 Leave a comment

Somebody asked me about a book about Empress Cixi of China (1835-1908); Cixi had huge obstacles to overcome; she is much maligned but this 2013 biography by Jung Chang EMPRESS DOWAGER CIXI, THE CONCUBINE WHO LAUNCHED MODERN CHINA paints a somewhat different picture.

Empress Cixi of China

A JOURNEY INTO IRAQI KURDISTAN

February 27, 2018 Leave a comment

kurdistan
Photo by Mark Edward Harris, Cooling off beneath the Gali Begg waterfall

Off to Erbil or Arbil in Iraqi Kurdistan – where civilization goes back 5,000 years, where one finds one of the oldest Christian monasteries, Mar Mattai clinging to the side of a mountain where some 7, 000 monks once lived during the ninth century; where the Persian King Darius III “met” Alexander the Great, -a hauntingly beautiful countryside of high mountains and low valleys, by plane one hour and 40 minutes from Amman to Arbil – what is there not to like!!!! Tour operators are counting on more and more tourists if and when the war winds down.

Next time I am in Austria …….not that far away any more……

Read the article in NYT Travel section February 4th, page one and four.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

Categories: Middle East, Uncategorized

FORM INTO SPIRIT: ELLSWORTH KELLY’S AUSTIN

February 27, 2018 Leave a comment

ellsworth-kellys

https://blantonmuseum.org/exhibition/form-into-spirit-ellsworth-kellys-austin/

Through April 29th!

A free standing building with luminous windows -his final work was unveiled only this past weekend. It is also likely the most ambitious work the American artist ever made: a 2,700-square-foot building loosely modeled after a Romanesque church on the grounds of the Blanton Museum.

Go and see it soon.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

More books about global trade……

February 17, 2018 Leave a comment

silk trade

SILK, PORCELAIN AND LACQUER: CHINA AND JAPAN AND THEIR TRADE WITH WESTERN EUROPE AND THE NEW WORLD, 1500-1644.

By Teresa Canepa, London 2016.

Global trade via trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific networks satisfying the demand for luxury goods, creating profitable opportunities for Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch and English merchants. The book explains that Chinese porcelains and silk was produced and shipped in great quantities whereas practically all Japanese lacquer traded by the Europeans was made to order. The book is said to be exceptionally well illustrated.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

 

A PORTRAIT OF THE HINDUS

February 17, 2018 Leave a comment

BALTHAZAR SOLVYNS & THE EUROPEAN IMAGE OF INDIA 1760-1824

by ROBERT L. HARDGRAVE, Jr.

portrait of hindus

Austin, Texas, August 2003
Oxford University Press

Robert L. Hardgrave, Jr. is the Louann and Larry Temple Centennial Professor Emeritus in the Humanities at the University of Texas at Austin. A specialist in the domestic and international politics of South Asia, he taught at UT in the departments of Government and Asian Studies from 1967 until his retirement in 2001.

My fault that I have never heard about the Flemish artist François Balthazar Solvyns (1760-1824) who arrived in Calcutta in 1794 and lived there until 1803.

He painted oil paintings and made drawings and then etchings. He portrays figures of many different occupations over 100 years before the “Company School” paintings of the 19th century.

The book is very scholarly written, – I cannot read more than a few pages at a time -the book has many black/white and color prints and these alone are very entertaining and informative. I have to return the book to the UT library and will have to buy it soon soon because the price seems to be going up!

Cheers,

Elisabeth