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Posts Tagged ‘art’

DALLAS MUSEUM OF FINE ART / THE KEIR COLLECTION OF ISLAMIC ART

on loan until April 2019

https://www.dma.org/art/exhibitions/keir-collection-islamic-art-gallery

islamic art1

Edmund de Unger, an Hungarian born property developer and art collector, built the Keir Collection of Islamic art and bequeathed it in 2008 to the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. The arrangement to curate the collection came to an end and the collection is now hosted by the Dallas Museum of Art for a fifteen year renewable loan.

Highlights include textiles and carpets from Persia and the Ottoman and Mughal empires, 8th to 13th century Persian lustreware, early rock crystal objects, miniature paintings from the “Book of Kings”, Shahnameh, metalwork and enamel.

What a chance for us in Texas to view this collection and learn about some of the best of Islamic art!!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

FORGING AN ART MARKET IN CHINA

October 29, 2013 Leave a comment

THE NEW YORK TIMES FRONT PAGE    October 28, 2013
FORGING AN ART MARKET IN CHINA

ART MARKET (not often seen)

ART MARKET IN CHINA (rarely seen)

FORGING  (seen with some frequency not necessarily front page)

Who will make this into  movie? 

I am in the middle of authenticating and appraising for insurance purposes and perhaps resale purposes, for a Chinese born client several 18th and 19th century porcelains (no problem) and several black ink on paper paintings signed  Qi Baishi (will not do this). Client explained that there were many high  auction records in China for similar ceramics and paintings. Yes there are and I was about  to explain that the Chinese auction market has played havoc with appraisal values and with auction results,  and with transparency, and why a Chinese artist may want to render something in an earlier style to pay respects to an earlier master  (all so  clearly set out in a book I recently blogged about: ORIGINAL INTENTIONS, ESSAYS ON PRODUCTION, REPRODUCTION, AND INTERPRETATION IN THE ARTS OF CHINA, Pearce/Steuber, 2012 University Press of Florida), and that as an appraiser at this time, we cannot rely so much on Chinese auction records.

But instead I handed my client the NYT article spread over three and one half pages! The article  explains why the art market in China has taken off so fast over the last few years, why Chinese artists rank first  or seem to rank first as best selling artists in the world, why  auction prices in China are so high, what in the Chinese culture  entices the Chinese buyer to buy and then not infrequently not pay,  how the reverence for earlier masterworks  is  seen as contributing to forgeries as I mentioned above,  and why the raising of a paddle in the west and in China seems to have different interpretations.

Here it is:

AMAZON FINE ART STORE IS OPEN!

http://www.amazon.com/b?ie=UTF8&node=6685269011

Most of the items posted  at this time are prints and as an appraiser I can only say “Buyer Beware”. There are many questions surrounding the listings but this is all in its early stages. Make sure you find out what you are buying. There is already enough confusion about what constitutes a print and most sellers are not specific about the medium used and they often do not know themselves – so you have to be well informed.

 So that you can  read more about this from an appraiser’s point of view, I am forwarding a link to APPRAISERS WORKSHOPS,  a newsletter by  Jane C. Brennom, ISA CAPP, and Todd  W. Sigeti, ISA CAPP.

Read more:
Amazon Fine Art Sale Raise Questions

Cheers,

Elisabeth

Categories: Asian Art Tags: , , ,

SCULPTURE OF DEVOTION

THE RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART in New York,

always, always has the most interesting exhibits.

SCULPTURE OF DEVOTION FROM THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM OF ART

This time courtesy of  the Brooklyn Museum of Art – due to the temporary closing of its Asian galleries.

On view until July 7, 2014. 

http://www.rmanyc.org/nav/exhibitions/view/2120

The exhibit traces in chronological and geographical fashion the stylistic development of Hindu and Buddhist  sculptural art back to its origins in ancient Indian art.   Included are pieces from Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Korea and Japan.

India_East_550

Cheers,

Elisabeth and Natasha

BATIK: SPECTACULAR TEXTILES OF JAVA

February 7, 2013 Leave a comment

THE ASIAN ART MUSEUM IN SAN FRANCISCO

November 2, 2012 to May 5, 2013
Batik-exhibition-1
Batik is found almost everywhere today – as upholstery fabric, as fashion fabric or as a work of art.  This exhibit is a reminder of what batik first looked like and how it incorporated motifs from a wide variety of religions and cultures into its design.
The art of batik, a wax- resist dyeing technique may have been practiced for thousands of years in other parts of Asia but it was in Indonesia on the island of Java that  batik  has not only reached  the highest level of craftsmanship but has long played  an important role for everyday and ceremonial cloth.
Special designs were used for special occasions and sometimes batik was decorated with gold leaf or dust. Contemporary batik is very different in color and design from the traditional methods used in Yogyakarta and Surakarta. While traditional batik uses predominantly indigo and brown — most commonly available natural dyes — batik artists now use an array of striking colors and designs.
Enjoy the exhibit!
Elisabeth and Natasha

COURSE SERIES JAPAN: A CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE LAND OF THE RISING SUN

February 2, 2013 Leave a comment
More news from the
BOSTON MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS 
 
A semester-long course series
JAPAN:  A CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE LAND OF THE RISING SUN

http://www.mfa.org/programs/series/japan-cultural-history-land-rising-sun

Journey through Japanese cultural history, from the feudal past to the pop-centric present

This 10-week course is inspired by the MFA’s superlative collection of Japanese works—the largest in the world outside Japan—and the spectacular artistry found in the exhibition “Samurai! Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection,” opening in the Gund Gallery on April 14. Journey through Japanese cultural history, from the feudal past to the pop-centric present.

Screen shot 2013-02-02 at 9.51.22

Ten-Session Course Tickets
$200 MFA members, seniors, and students; $250 nonmembers
Order at 1-800-440-6975 or in person at any MFA ticketing desk

Individual Session Tickets
$25 MFA members, seniors, and students; $30 nonmembers
Online: using the link in the red box
By phone: call the MFA Ticket line at 1-800-440-6975
In person: at any MFA ticketing desk

Ticketing desk hours:

Mon, Tue, Sat, and Sun, 10 am–4:15 pm; and Wed–Fri, 10 am–9:15 pm

In This Series:

Japanese History as Chrysanthemum and Sword March 6, 2013

Bad Monks, Temple Warriors: The Spectrum of Japanese Religious History March 13, 2013

Edo Period (1603–1868): Politics, Peace, and People March 20, 2013

Performing Arts in the Age of the Shoguns (1192–1868) March 27, 2013

Additional Film Event: Humanity and Paper Balloons March 29, 2013

The Many Worlds of Ukiyo-e Prints April 3, 2013

Additional Film Event: Humanity and Paper Balloons April 3, 2013

The Japanese Interwar Era (1868–1947) Through the Lens of Film April 10, 2013

Samurai, Arms, and Armor April 24, 2013

Additional Film Event: Harakiri April 24, 2013

Additional Film Event: Harakiri April 26, 2013

The Drama of Resistance and Rebellion: Postwar Through the 1990s May 1, 2013

The Culture of “Cute” May 8, 2013

Small Plates: Culinary Culture and Social Change in Japan May 15, 2013

Passport to Japan: Lecture, Exhibition, Film, and Food May 15, 2013

Cheers,

Elisabeth and Natasha

 

RADICAL TERRAIN : MODERNIST ART FROM INDIA

November 16, 2012 – April 29, 2013
RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART
NYC
One of my favorite museums, the Rubin Museum of Art, famous for having the largest  collection of religious art from cultures of the Himalayas, including Nepal, Tibet and Bhutan as well as related cultures from India, Mongolia and China, is presenting the final of a three-part series of Modernist Art from India. The exhibition highlights art after independence, with paintings showing how the vast landscape of India is viewed by artists.  Modernist paintings from India – might be viewed as a contradiction but the West has no monopoly on Modernism. India has a complex history of modern art, starting in the early 20th century with the  Bengal School of Art centered in Calcutta/Kolkata and led by Abanindranath Tagore, a nephew of the famous poet Rabindranath Tagore. In the 1930s and 40s individual art schools flourished in Bombay, Baroda, Madras and  New Delhi.
The show was curated by Beth Citron and includes paintings by Lisi Raskin, Marc Handelman, Seher Shah, and Janaina Tschaepe, Krishna Shamrao Kulkarni, Gieve Patel, Sudhir Patwardhan, S. H. Raza and others — all showing a variety of abstract and figural landscapes often  with a social and  political perspective.
 Image
Untitled, S. H Raza, 1956; Oil and mixed media on canvas
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

A NEW WING AT THE LOUVRE MUSEUM DEDICATED TO ISLAMIC ART

October 13, 2012 1 comment
The Louvre opened a  5,000 sq. meter space with room to display about 3,000 artifacts, spanning the art, architecture and history of Islamic art from Spain to India, and chronologically from the seventh century to the nineteenth century. This is the largest collection of Islamic art  in Europe, all enveloped in a structure of metal and glass under a “flying carpet”  roof of undulating glass.

I hope that by learning more  about each other’s  culture, we will bridge the divide that currently exists. http://www.louvre.fr/en

Cheers,

Elisabeth

 

 

 

 

 

GLOBAL AMBASSADOR OF CHINESE ART

Uli Sigg standing in front of a piece in his collection: “Untitled,” by Fang Lijun.

Former Swiss Ambassador to China (during the mid 1980s) and current deputy chairman of Ringier holding AG (the most substantial media company in Switzerland), Uli Sigg, owns the most comprehensive private collection of Chinese contemporary art in the world. Upon beginning collecting in 1985, and witnessing the growth of Chinese contemporary art since birth, Sigg’s vast collection now spans 1,463 pieces, including works from 350 renowned Chinese artists.

Wang Jie’s “Hong Kong Home for Chinese Art Trove” of the People’s Daily, and “The Collector of Chinese Contemporary Art,” are articles about Sigg’s recent situation involving donating his collection, and his encouragement Chinese contemporary artists.

Establishing the Chinese Contemporary Art Awards (CCAA) himself in 1998, Sigg is currently the only award giving entity in China. Sigg, along with the many Chinese contemporary artists and art enthusiasts, wish to see additional award ceremonies founded by Chinese companies and entrepreneurs — in order to raise the price of the awards, as well as to create a Chinese award for Chinese artists.

Sigg’s fondness for Chinese contemporary art has genuinely helped it evolve to a level of world-recognition. Winner of the 1998 CCAA and internationally renowned artist Zhou Tiehai, mentioned that he would not have been able to purchase his house with out Sigg purchasing his works.

Currently, Sigg has decided to donate his collection to the M+ Museum in Hong Kong — with a scheduled opening in 2017 — as a pre-existing Chinese museum suited for displaying his collection could not be found. Despite talking with European museums, Sigg settled on the idea of donating his assortment of art for display in China, where Chinese people would have un-restricted access to it. M+ Museum, which will host Sigg’s collection and display other venues, will be located in Hong Kong’s pivotal West Kowloon Cultural District. With nearly 60,000 square meters of floor space, M+ Museum will be yet another immense asset to Hong Kong as an international city. I will certainly enjoy to visit M+ Museum upon its opening, and with appreciation for all that Uli Sigg has completed, soon the world will be able to see his full collection.

Here is a link for M+ Museum: http://www.wkcda.hk/en/museum/index.html

This link is for the online article “Hong Kong Home for Chinese Art Trove”: http://www.china.org.cn/arts/2012-07/25/content_26012690.htm

This is a link to the online article “The Collector of Chinese Contemporary Art”: http://www.china.org.cn/english/NM-e/98257.htm

Cheers,

Natasha

KABUL NATIONAL MUSEUM

Such photos always bring back happy memories, formed during times predating the looting of the museum and before the Taliban destruction of the Bamyan Buddha statues.

Located between China and India to the east and Europe to the west, Afghanistan was at the commercial and religious crossroads of civilizations in Central Asia. And it still is.

Many of us are encouraged by the increase in education offered to and avidly taken up by boys and girls and their parents in Afghanistan – real progress made over the last ten years despite the war. If you ever want to participate in supporting a small but ongoing and very successful endeavor to educate a child, a family, a community – go to aynieducation.org, Ayni Supporting Education in Afghanistan, formerly known as Journey with an Afghan School. I have supported them for some years and know the founder, and the current Executive Director and receive first hand reports from the schools and their principals and teachers.

Tashakor. Thank you.

Elisabeth