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Posts Tagged ‘Buddhist’

RESTORING MEDIEVAL BUDDHIST SHRINES IN NEPAL’S HIMALAYAS

In this photograph taken on June 15, 2016 Nepalese artist Tsewang Jigme….restores  sacred murals…..in the remote Upper Mustang region.

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In Nepal’s  Upper Mustang region, once part of the Buddhist kingdom of Mustang high on the Tibetan plateau, the artist  Tsewang  Jigme works on the restoration of antique murals. It is said that murals in some temples in this area predate the oldest temples in Tibet.  But neglect, wind, rain and smoke have turned the bright frescoes into black. Many of these shrines survived the Cultural Revolution of the 1960’s and the earthquake of  April 2015.
Read this article to see how the restoration of these sacred murals is making progress in the 21st century: http://www.mysinchew.com/node/114954?tid=
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

SCULPTURE OF DEVOTION

THE RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART in New York,

always, always has the most interesting exhibits.

SCULPTURE OF DEVOTION FROM THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM OF ART

This time courtesy of  the Brooklyn Museum of Art – due to the temporary closing of its Asian galleries.

On view until July 7, 2014. 

http://www.rmanyc.org/nav/exhibitions/view/2120

The exhibit traces in chronological and geographical fashion the stylistic development of Hindu and Buddhist  sculptural art back to its origins in ancient Indian art.   Included are pieces from Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Korea and Japan.

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Cheers,

Elisabeth and Natasha

CONTEMPORARY BURMESE ART BY BURMESE ARTISTS IN BURMA

November 16, 2011 Leave a comment
A recent article in the NYT (October 23rd) highlighted Burmese Artists. It explained that contemporary or modern Burmese art had been slow in developing because of lack of interest, lack of local support and at one time, political censorship. Several galleries were mentioned: 
 
River Gallery in the old Strand Hotel in Yangon. 
New Treasure Art Gallery, owned by Min Wae Aung; also offering an artist in residency program. 
 
The painting featured in the NYT  of five monk figures rendered in a somewhat abstract style – that I liked most –  was by Min Wae Aung and it said that his paintings sell for up to $ 20,000 through galleries in Hong Kong, London and Paris. 
 
Burma has such a rich  Buddhist cultural tradition that one does not expect impressionistic oil paintings, paintings of nudes, and abstract art. Artists have flourished and been censored and neglected but survived, depending on patronage and political  climate  and Burmese art will surely continue to blossom.  What is surprising to me is how frequently Burmese artists seem to exhibit in places like Hong Kong, London and Paris – considering how isolated the country is politically.  But art always finds a way!
 
This is the link to the article: New Vistas for Burmese Artists
 
This painting is by Min Wae Aung, titled Monks on the Morning Round, and I found it on dhammaweb.net. It conveys the style I like.
 
 

TRACKING TIBETAN ART

November 9, 2011 Leave a comment

“Eighty to ninety percent of Tibetan art was destroyed or displaced during the Cultural Revolution”, the art historian David Jackson recently said. Mr. Jackson has spent many years not only identifying Tibetan artists, their patrons and subject matter but also  comparing thousands of portraits looking for patterns in hand gestures, robe colors, jewelry, furniture. He published it all in his book, Mirror of the Buddha: Early Portraits of Tibet.

To coincide with this book is an exhibition at the Rubin Museum of Art  http://www.rmanyc.org/  in New York, Mirror of the Buddha: Early Portraits of Tibet., open through March 5, 2012.

The exhibit presents examples of early portraits, often of founding masters of important Buddhist schools portrayed as holy personages. These paintings are mainly rendered in the eastern India-inspired Sharri  style. And this style was most faithfully followed by Tibetan artists although it spread to many parts of Asia.
 

LUMINOUS: THE ART OF ASIA AT THE SEATTLE ART MUSEUM

October 19, 2011 Leave a comment
 
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Fresh from a celebrated tour throughout Japan, Luminous: The Art of Asia will showcase the jewels of Seattle Art Museum’s (SAM) Asian collections, featuring 160 of the museum’s masterpieces including paintings, screens, sculpture, ceramics, stone, wood, lacquer and metal ware. All objects come from the Seattle Art Museum, home to one of the finest collections of Asian art in North America. The exhibition opens on October 13, 2011, marking the first time these objects have been assembled in a major exhibition at SAM Downtown. 
Curated by Japanese art historian Catherine Roche, the objects in Luminous range from 1,500 year-old Buddhist fragments, dazzling golden screens and bold ink paintings to rich Tibetan mandalas, sumptuous Japanese kimonos and gossamer Korean bojagi. A small selection of the museum’s newest acquisitions in contemporary Asian painting, ceramics and photography will also be on view. In addition, the show will open an animated dialogue about art and Asia, beauty and vitality through excerpts of conversations with Do Ho Suh. “What I’m interested in is the common thread that links me to, say, a three-thousand-year-old object. It was beautiful then and it is beautiful now. Can beauty be absolutely free from time, space, and context?” said Do Ho Suh in a conversation with Roche about the exhibition. 
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SPIRIT IN ART: A BUDDHIST VISION IN TIBET

October 19, 2011 Leave a comment


Dr. ROBERT THURMAN 

SPIRIT IN ART: A BUDDHIST VISION IN TIBET
November 4th and November 5th

TORSO OF THE BUDDHA

Nelson-Atkins Museum loans its priced TORSO OF THE BUDDHA to Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St.Louis for is exhibition REFLECTIONS OF THE BUDDHA

September 9, 2011 to March 10, 2012


The Nelson-Atkins is famous for is Asian art collection and especially for its Buddhist sculptural pieces. The Torso of the Buddha is considered one of the best Buddhist sculptures outside India. When I got involved with Asian art,  I studied the pieces at the Nelson Atkins first acquired under Laurence Sickman who has been associated with the museum since 1931  and was its director from 1953 to 1977.

The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts shows masterpieces of the greatest Buddhist sculptures and hanging scrolls in the United States, representing several major traditions and sites of production from the late 2nd to the 18th century, including pieces from Tibet, China, Japan, Korea, and India. It is remarkable that so many substantial pieces can be admired in one place.