Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Kushan’

NEW DISCOVERY IN PAKISTAN DATING BACK TO MAURYAN AND KUSHAN DYNASTIES IN SWAT, PAKISTAN

Archeologists excavated in April and June of 2016 layers  of cities associated with  Indo-Greek, Mauryan and Kushan cultures.
Mauryan settlements dating to the third century BC – think of the great Mauryan king Ashoka, the  grandson of the founder of the dynasty who vigorously promoted Buddhism among other things with carved edicts  on pillars of stone and wood from Bengal  to Afghanistan.  Some of us have admired the great lion capital in Sarnath from a time when episodes  and symbols from Buddha’s life  were portrayed – in this case the lotus and the wheel of law – instead of the later  presentations of Buddha  – seen first in the arts of Gandharan and Mathura.
unnamed
Archeologists also excavated a large temple with four pillars belonging to the Kushan era, 2nd century BC to second century AD. The Kushans dominated the areas of the Hindu Kush into Kabul, Gandhara, northern Pakistan and north-western India. They controlled the trade between China in the east and the Romans in the west. Under the famous Kushan ruler Kanishka ( 144 to 172 AD) Buddhist settlements flourished including Gandhara with its distinctive Graeco – Buddhist art form that influenced the arts in Central Asia and then China.
I first read about this discovery in Buddhist Art News:
Cheers,
Elisabeth and Natasha

WALTERS ART MUSEUM REMOVES COPYRIGHT RESTRICTIONS ON 10,000 IMAGES

In concert with other museums,The Walters of Baltimore now makes it possible to download  free some 10,000 images from its website. The museum has enhanced the descriptions and information about the art works, making it more accessible to scholars and casual visitors alike.
 
The image below is of a Kushan goddess, ca. 100 from The Walters, a kingdom in the northern Indian subcontinent and Afghanistan in the ancient area of Bactria  whose style greatly influenced early Buddha images. Images of Roman emperors were transformed into Indian rulers.  Under their most famous ruler,  Kanishka,  who fortunately left us textual materials and coins, the empire extended all the way to the Tarim Basin (Silk Road – Kothan, Kashgar) .