THE CASE FOR REBUILDING THE BAMYAN BUDDHAS TO THEIR ORIGINAL GLORY

Remember 2001 when the Bamyan Buddhas were destroyed ……… some of us were fortunate to have seen them before this happened. This is an article about possibly rebuilding the colossal statues that have greeted pilgrims, merchants, monks since the 7th century.

Read this article if this interests you.

https://www.buddhistdoor.net/features/buddhistdoor-view-the-case-for-restoring-the-bamiyan-buddhas-to-their-original-glory

Bamyan

Buddhist Art News

As a subscriber to Buddhist Art News I come across some interesting and unusual articles- thought you might enjoy a few!

https://buddhistartnews.wordpress.com/author/buddhistartnews/

Buddhist Art News

THE RUBIN MUSEUM OF ART HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON INDIA IN FULL FRAME

On view through September 4th, 2017

The exhibit comprises 69 black and white photographs from Cartier- Bresson’s travels in India during the mid 20th century as well as his letters, camera and personal items.

Quote from Rubin’s website:

Disputed borders, refugees, charismatic leaders, assassinations—the India of the mid-century does not sound so distant from the world today. It was a time and place captured expertly and in great depth by the pioneering photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908–2004).

In 1947 Cartier-Bresson co-founded the internationally renowned cooperative photographic agency Magnum Photos. Later that same year he undertook his first trip to India as part of a three-year stay in Asia. At the time, India was undergoing a massive political transition, having gained independence from British colonial rule and been partitioned from Pakistan. In January 1948 Cartier-Bresson traveled to Delhi to meet with one of the key players in that transition, India’s great leader Mahatma Gandhi. It would be one of Gandhi’s final meetings before the leader’s assassination at the hands of a Hindu nationalist on January 30.

The resulting photos of Gandhi’s last day of life and the events surrounding his funeral, which helped catapult Cartier-Bresson to international fame, are part of a selection of 69 photographs from the photographer’s travels to India shared in the exhibition. They reflect his abiding interest in the people and sites of India, including some examples of his “street photography” style that has influenced generations of photographers. Together they illustrate a master photographer’s perspective on transformative moments in Indian history.

End Quote

india

Indian exhibit at the Blanton

EPIC TALES FROM ANCIENT INDIA: PAINTINGS  FROM THE SAN DIEGO MUSEUM 
AT THE BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART IN AUSTIN, TEXAS
July 9 – October 1, 2017

Exhibitions
Rotations
Events
Past Exhibitions & Rotations

blanton

http://blantonmuseum.org/exhibitions-calendar

These are not just any Indian paintings but from the collection of Edwin Binney 3r showing us paintings from the Ramayana, Bhagavata Burana, Ragamala, and the Shahnama – the Persian Book of Kings. Edward Binney 3rd bequeathed some 1453 paintings and manuscripts from Southeast Asia to the San Diego Museum of Art. The exhibition is accompanied by musical performances, dances and storytelling. Edwin Binney was a trustee of the San Diego Museum of Art and his goal was too create an encyclopedic collection of Indian paintings. Only two museums – the Metropolitan and the LA County Museum have a comparable Indian painting collection, as well as the private Stuart Cay Welch.

Cheers,

Elisabeth

DALLAS MUSEUM OF FINE ART / THE KEIR COLLECTION OF ISLAMIC ART

on loan until April 2019

https://www.dma.org/art/exhibitions/keir-collection-islamic-art-gallery

islamic art1

Edmund de Unger, an Hungarian born property developer and art collector, built the Keir Collection of Islamic art and bequeathed it in 2008 to the Pergamon Museum in Berlin. The arrangement to curate the collection came to an end and the collection is now hosted by the Dallas Museum of Art for a fifteen year renewable loan.

Highlights include textiles and carpets from Persia and the Ottoman and Mughal empires, 8th to 13th century Persian lustreware, early rock crystal objects, miniature paintings from the “Book of Kings”, Shahnameh, metalwork and enamel.

What a chance for us in Texas to view this collection and learn about some of the best of Islamic art!!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

Museum for Vancouver

SINGAPOREAN BILLIONAIRE plans to build Asian Art Museum in Vancouver  dedicated to Asian and Buddhist Art.

Oei Hong Leon, a part time resident of Vancouver, loves Buddhism “not so much as religion but as a personal philosophy “. He owns about 50,000 pieces now housed in a private museum in Singapore.

At the same time the Vancouver International Centre of Contemporary Asian Art, and proponents like Robert H. N. Ho and China’s Poly Culture Group have suggested to build a museum for Chinese Art in Vancouver. My comment: The Poly Culture Group operates as a culture and art company in China – as art business and auction, as performance and theater management and as cinema investment and management company – all specially fostered by China Poly Group, a gigantic state owned Chinese business- if I am not mistaken.

And Poly Culture has launched a flagship art gallery for rare artifacts from Beijing’s Famous Summer Palace – in Vancouver.

I must visit Vancouver soon!!!

Cheers,

Elisabeth

Swat’s Uddiyana Kingdom

EXPLORING THE VALLEY OF SWAT once known as the Switzerland of the east…..
in Pakistan

SWAT

Swat District in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan has a history of over 2000 years, with Buddhist, Hindu and Islamic kingdoms and most recently the Taliban.

High mountains, clear lakes and green meadows are attractive not only to tourists. The Valley of Swat is said to have had over one thousand stupas and monasteries – today we now know of about 400 Buddhist sites – most frequently associated with Gandharan and Kushan art. A group of women trekkers, some from Swat University visited sites in March 2017 – that saw the times of Alexander the Great, the Kushan empire and Ashoka (Mauryan empire) – one of the earlier followers of Buddha.

Can we still go there to visit??

Cheers,

Elisabeth

(top photo from Buddhist Art News)

SWAT2